C++11 is kind of like “C++ Dreamliner.” It’s built with world-class modern materials. It took a couple more years to finish than originally expected. But now it’s starting to roll out worldwide and flying more safely and efficiently than ever. (European readers may equally consider it “C++ 380.”)

I write and teach, speaking about C++11 in particular:

“Modern C++ is clean, safe, and fast – modern C++ code is as readable and as type- and memory-safe as code written in any other modern language [*], and it has always been the king of ‘fast’ and is now faster than ever with new features like move semantics.” – Herb Sutter

Bjarne Stroustrup made me add, at the end of the “clean and safe” part:

“[*] When used in a modern style.” – Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne and I claim this to be true. Others have disputed various parts of this statement – whether C++11 really has a usable safe subset, whether C++ is really necessarily faster than code in other languages, and other questions. What’s the truth?

These answers matter. Type safety and memory safety are important not only for writing reliable code that will fail or be abused less often, but also for improving developer productivity so that developers can spend less time on overhead “taxes” like checking for unsafe casts or buffer overruns. And the claim that C++ really is the king of “fast” has been consistently challenged for most of its history.

In this panel, Scott, Andrei, and I will weigh in with discussion – and data – on these important and current questions.