It’s time for, not one, but two brand-new, up-to-date talks on the state of the art of concurrency and parallelism in C++. I’m going to put them together especially and only for C++ and Beyond 2012, and I’ll be giving them nowhere else this year:

  • C++ Concurrency – 2012 State of the Art (and Standard)
  • C++ Parallelism – 2012 State of the Art (and Standard)

And there’s a lot to tell. 2012 has already been a busy year for the pushing the boundaries of both “shipping-and-practical” and “proto-standard” concurrency and parallelism in C++:

  • In February, the spring ISO C++ standards meeting saw record attendance at 73 experts (normal is 50-55), and spent the full week primarily on new language and library proposals, with notable emphasis on the area of concurrency and parallelism. There was so much interest that I formed four Study Groups and appointed chairs: the largest on concurrency and parallelism (SG1, Hans Boehm), and three others on modules (SG2, Doug Gregor), filesystem (SG3, Beman Dawes), and networking (SG4, Kyle Kloepper).
  • Three weeks ago, we hosted another three-day face-to-face meeting for SG1 and SG4 – and at nearly 40 people the SG1 attendance rivaled that of a normal full ISO C++ meeting, with a who’s-who of the world’s concurrency and parallelism experts in attendance and further proposal presentations from companies like IBM, Intel, and Microsoft. There was so much interest that I had to form a new Study Group 5 for Transactional Memory (SG5), and appointed Michael Wong of IBM as chair.
  • Over the summer, we’ll all be working on updated proposals for the October ISO C++ meeting in Portland.

Things are heating up, and we’re narrowing down which areas to focus on.

I’ve spoken and written on these topics before. Here’s what’s different about these talks:

  • Brand new: This material goes beyond what I’ve written and taught about before in my Effective Concurrency articles and courses.
  • Cutting-edge current: It covers the best-practices state of the art techniques and shipping tools, and what parts of that are standardized in C++11 already (the answer to that one may surprise you!) and what’s en route to near-term standardization and why, with coverage of the latest discussions.
  • Mainstream hardware – many kinds of parallelism: What’s the relationship among multi-core CPUs, hardware threads, SIMD vector units (Intel SSE and AVX, ARM Neon), and GPGPU (general-purpose computation on GPUs, which I covered at C++ and Beyond 2011)? Which are most interesting, what technologies are available now, and what’s being considered for near-term standardization?
  • Blocking vs. non-blocking: What’s the difference between blocking and non-blocking styles, why on earth would you care, which kinds does C++11 support, and how are we looking at rounding it out in C++1y?
  • Task and data parallelism: What’s the difference between task parallelism and data parallelism, which kind of of hardware does each allow you to exploit, and why?
  • Work stealing: What’s the difference between thread pools and work stealing, what are the major flavors of work stealing, which of these (if any) does C++11 already support and is already shipping on some advanced commercial C++ compilers today (this answer will likely surprise you), and what needs to be done in the next round for a complete state-of-the-art parallelism story in C++1y?

The answers all matter to you – even the ones not yet in the C++ standard – because they are real, available in shipping products, and affect how you design your software today.

This will be a broad and deep dive. At C++ and Beyond 2011, the attendees (audience!) included some of the world’s leading experts on parallelism and compilers. At these sessions of C&B 2012, I expect anyone who wasn’t personally at the SG1 meeting this month, even world-class experts, will learn something new in these talks. I certainly did, and that’s why I’m motivated to turn the information into talks and share. This isn’t just cool stuff – it’s important and useful in production code today.

I hope to see many of you at C&B 2012. I’m excited about these topics, and about Scott’s and Andrei’s new material – you just can’t get this stuff anywhere else.

Asheville is going to be blast. I can’t wait.


P.S.: I haven’t seen this much attention and investment in C++ since last century – C++ conferences at record numbers, C++ compiler investments by the biggest companies in the industry (e.g., Clang), and much more that we’ve seen already…

… and a little bird tells me there’s a lot more major C++ news coming this year. Stay tuned, and fasten your seat belts. 2012 ain’t done yet, not by a long shot, and I’ll be able to say more about C++ as a whole (besides the specific topics mentioned above) for the first time at C&B in August. I hope to see you there.

FYI, C&B is already over 60% full, and early bird registration ends this Friday, June 1 – so register today.